Climbing Roses . com

Our Roses:

Rose Index

Rose Index

Climbing Roses

Climbing Roses


Climbing Miniature Roses

Climbing Miniature Roses


Climbing English Roses

Climbing English Roses


Climbing English Legend Roses

Climbing English Legend Roses


Climbing Hardy Roses

Climbing Hardy Roses


Climbing Species Roses

Climbing Species Roses

Rambling Roses

Rambling Roses


Repeat Flowering Ramblers

Repeat Flowering Ramblers


Roses For Climbing Into Trees

Roses For Climbing Into Trees


Small-Flowered Climbers

Small-Flowered Climbers

Ordering Info
Our Ordering & Shipping Process
Also Visit:

Heirloom Roses

John's Miniature Roses


Rose Information
 Frequently Asked Questions About Roses (F.A.Q.)

1. What is an own-root rose?
2. How do own-root roses differ from roses at the local nursery?
3. Can rose virus spread from one rose plant in my garden to another?
4. Do own root roses grow differently than grafted roses?
5. Will my own-root roses bloom the first year?
6. How do I plant my roses?
7. Why such a big hole?
8. Should I fertilize my roses? What should I use and how often?
9. What type of fertilizer do I use on more mature plants?
10. Why do people use Epsom salts on their roses? Do you recommend it for own-root roses?
11. How and when do you prune roses?
12. How far apart do I plant climbers or ramblers?
13. How much should I water my roses?
14 I have a lot of shade in my garden. Can I grow roses in the shade?
15. How long can my roses stay in the pots that they were sent in?
16. Can my rose be grown permanently in a pot?
17. Can I plant my roses with companion plants?
18. How close to the house can I plant a rose?
19. I live in a very tropical climate. Which roses do well for my area?
20. I hear that own-root roses are disease free. Does this mean that I will never have to spray my roses?
21. My rose has grown a lot but has not bloomed. Have I done something wrong?
22. How do I treat for aphids?
23. I need to move large rose bush. When and how is the best time to transplant?
24. My own-root rose is smaller than the ones for sale at the discount center. How long will it take to grow to maturity?
25. I live in a cold climate where the ground freezes in the winter. How do I protect my roses in the winter?
26. My rose blooms only at the top of the canes and they are 10 feet tall. How can I make the rose
27. The leaves on my rose bushes are yellow and falling off. What does that mean?
28. The catalog said my rose was supposed to be fragrant but it isn't. Why?
29. My rose doesn't rebloom like it is supposed to. What is wrong?
30. Can I plant roses under pine and fir trees?
31. Can I spread bark dust around my roses?
32. How do I take care of hanging basket roses?
33. The local nurseryman suggested using mushroom compost when I plant my roses. Is this okay?
34. Which kind of manure is the best?
35. Is it ever too hot to plant roses? Should I try to protect them from direct heat?
36. How can I protect my rose from deer?
37. Will any of my own-root roses "sucker"?
38. Can I use a root stimulant when I plant my roses?
39. How much growth will my climbers put on in the first year?
  back to top of page

1. What is an own-root rose?

An own root rose is grown by rooting a cutting from a stock plant. It is much more labor intensive for us to produce an own-root rose plant than it is to produce one from budding on grafting root stock. Your own-root plant will make a fine rose bush and reach a mature height at three years.
 
 back to top of page

2. How do own-root roses differ from roses at the local nursery?

Own-root roses are started in our greenhouses in tree seedling pots, then grown outside in their pots. Roses at local nurseries are grown in large fields mostly in California and they are larger in size (bigger does not mean better). Own-root roses arrive to greet you in the same pot in which they were propagated. Their roots are surrounded by soil and are not bared to the elements and therefore will not experience the transplant shock that bare-root roses will.
 
back to top of page

3. Can rose virus spread from one rose plant in my garden to another?
   
Rose virus, although in the long run can be a debilitating disease of the rose, can be spread only by budding or grafting. Thus since we start with virus-free roses and maintain that by growing only roses from cuttings, virus cannot be spread from an infected plant in your garden by cutting blooms or pruning.
 
back to top of page

4. Do own root roses grow differently than grafted roses?
   
The first year they grow somewhat differently. They produce vigorous canes of a smaller diameter than grafted roses. After their first pruning there will be little difference from a grafted rose.
  
back to top of page

5. Will my own-root roses bloom the first year?
 
Just as grafted roses, own-root roses will bloom the first year with the exception of some old garden roses, ramblers and climbers that do not bloom the first year. (Our own-root rose seedlings start blooming in just 6 weeks after germination).
back to top of page

6. How do I plant my roses?
 
Our recommendation for growing outstanding roses is to dig a big hole (2 feet deep and 2 feet wide). Fill the bottom 6 inches with well rotted cow or horse manure. Save of the soil that came from the hole and mix it 50/50 with a good mulch or peat moss. Refill the hole, plant the rose in the center of a 2 - 3 inch mound to compensate for the soil settling later. Water well. When your rose is shipped it will come with planting instructions.
  
back to top of page

7. Why such a big hole?
 
For optimum results from any rose, grafted or own-root, dig a big hole because rose roots will not grow well into compacted soil.
back to top of page

8. Should I fertilize my roses? What should I use and how often?
 
Yes. If you plant your rose in the Fall wait until Spring to begin fertilizing. Start fertilizing with liquid fertilizer at strength or use fish fertilizer at full strength. If you plant in the Spring or Summer: start about one month after planting and continue monthly until August. Always make your last fertilizer application in August so that the roses may harden off for winter The second year you may use granular fertilizer sparingly or liquid fish at full strength monthly until August. The third year use all fertilizers at full strength.
back to top of page

9. What type of fertilizer do I use on more mature plants?
 
On mature roses we recommend something like a 5-20-10- to 10-30-20 at to b cup per bush. Spread out around the drip line 2 to 4 times a year depending on the natural fertility of your soil. We do not recommend a fertilizer with a systemic insecticide in it.
  
back to top of page

10. Why do people use Epsom salts on their roses? Do you recommend it for own-root roses?
 
Epsom salts, which is magnesium sulfate, provides an important trace element. If you have just a few roses you may want to buy it at a drug store. For those with more roses, the most economical way is to buy magnesium sulfate at a feed store. Epsom salts promote stronger, sturdier stems, richer green foliage and deeper, richer colors in roses. We do recommend it for own root roses. The first year just a teaspoon or two in the early spring. For mature bushes use cup at the drip line.
  
back to top of page

11. How and when do you prune roses?
 
There are almost as many opinions on how to prune roses are there are gardeners. We will give our methods based on some 60 combined years of experience and having pruned countless numbers of roses. Know that the reasons for pruning roses are: 1. For the health of the plant. 2. To shape the plant. 3. To renew the plant.

Repeat flowering bush roses
Prune 2 to 4 inches of the tips back to just above a bud eye at planting time. From the second year on prune back to 12 to 18 inches to an outward facing bud eye. You can leave the canes longer if you wish. The longer the canes, the more blooms it will produce. The shorter pruned bush will produce larger but fewer blooms.

Once blooming roses
Once blooming roses should be pruned only immediately after they have stopped blooming as they flower on old wood the next year. Thinning and cutting away dead or undesirable canes can happen at any time. The second year and thereafter you may cut the bush back a foot or two to shape it and encourage more branching. This also will keep it smaller. Every other year we prune our once bloomers to 18 inches (only immediately after blooming has finished) to rejuvenate the bush with all new growth. If you desire a larger bush these roses will thrive with no pruning. Removing old growth though will keep it healthier.

Climbing and Rambling roses
Pruning to remove dead or undesirable canes can happen at any time but is best in the spring before new shoots have appeared. Limit ramblers to 6 - 8 canes coming from the base. After the rambler or climber is 4 years or older, cut 1 or 2 or the oldest canes at the base and remove to renew the growth of the plant. Much depends on how you have your climber or rambler trained. Don't stress out about how to do pruning. Watch your rose grow. See what it wants to do. With your pruners "negotiate" with your rose and convince it to grow the way you want it to.
  

back to top of page

12. How far apart do I plant climbers or ramblers?
 
We recommend planting climbers and ramblers 6 to 8 feet apart. If you really want to grow a lot of them you can plant at 4 feet but you will have to deal with their vigor. Planting at wider spacing and training the canes horizontally will encourage more blooms from the lateral growth.
  
back to top of page

13. How much should I water my roses?
 
Roses love water. Provide 1 to 2 inches of water a week per plant. A tuna fish can makes a great, economical water gage. Ground level watering is best but overhead watering is fine if you water in the mornings so that the plants do not go into the night with wet leaves.
  
back to top of page

14. I have a lot of shade in my garden. Can I grow roses in the shade?
 
Some roses may grow reasonably well in partial but not dense shade. They will produce fewer blooms and may grow a little more "leggy" but still provide beauty. Albas and hybrid musk roses plus those marked with black dots in the descriptions are recommended for partial shade. All roses do well in full sun. Most roses do well with 6 hours or more a day of sunlight with some needing as little as 4 four of sunlight.
  
back to top of page

15. How long can my roses stay in the pots that they were sent in?
 
Our own-root roses may stay in the pot they arrive in for a month or so. You must keep them well watered so they do not dry out. Water every day in warm weather. If your ground is not ready for them we suggest you pot them into larger pots.
   
back to top of page

16. Can my rose be grown permanently in a pot?
 
You may pot your own-root roses into large pots if you wish as long as the pot is large enough to accommodate the size of the plant. Smaller sized roses can live indefinitely in the appropriate sized pot. They must be watered every day and given winter protection where winters are cold.
  
back to top of page

17. Can I plant my roses with companion plants?
 
Roses combine very well with other plants. Lavender, cat mint, poppies, delphiniums, ladies mantle, pansies and fox glove to name a few have all done very well for Louise. Bulbs that have to be removed or replanted every year are not suggested.
  
back to top of page

18. How close to the house can I plant a rose?
 
Factors to consider: As with planting anything near the house you must consider the available sunlight. Planting on the south side of a white house in warm climates may create a overheated situation. If you are planting a climber next to the house, keep in mind how you want to handle your rose when repainting your house.
  
back to top of page

19. I live in a very tropical climate. Which roses do well for my area?
 
Most old garden roses need some winter chilling to perform well. The exception being Tea roses, China roses, Noisettes and Species from tropical climates.
  
back to top of page

20. I hear that own-root roses are disease free. Does this mean that I will never have to spray my roses?
 
Own-root roses are just as disease free or disease prone as the same variety in a grafted bush. We test the roses we offer in our gardens and strive to offer the best. Roses may be grown in most climates without spraying if you don't mind a few blemishes. Southern areas are more blackspot prone.
  
back to top of page

21. My rose has grown a lot but has not bloomed. Have I done something wrong?
 
Extra vigorous varieties, also climbers and ramblers may put all their energy into growth the first year or two and not bloom until the second or even third year. The major cause for this after the first year is over fertilizing.
  
back to top of page

22. How do I treat for aphids?
 
While aphids may be disposed of by using insecticides, there are alternatives. Knock them off the plant with a strong spray of water. Attract birds to you garden to feast on them. Pick them off by hand. If you have only a few roses, picking them off by hand is very easy. The newest buds appeal to them the most. Run your fingers along the stem, squishing the bugs as you go. There are other insects that like aphids for a meal, when you order these they always seem to end up in the neighbors garden.
  
back to top of page

23. I need to move large rose bush. When and how is the best time to transplant?
 
The best time is when the rose is dormant. First prune the roses back to about 1 foot or less. After it is moved it will have less top growth to support and will give the roots time to establish themselves. If you must move a rose during the growth season, do it the same way and after planting give some shade for a week or 2 and plenty of water. You should have 80 to 90% success.
  
back to top of page

24. My own-root rose is smaller than the ones for sale at the discount center. How long will it take to grow to maturity?
 
Our own-root roses are smaller. They have plenty of vigor and are free of rose virus. More than 50% of all grafted or budded roses are infected with rose virus although they may not show symptoms for a few years. Our roses also experience no transplant shock. Within 2 to 3 years they will be as large or larger than the rose from a discount center.
  
back to top of page

25. I live in a cold climate where the ground freezes in the winter. How do I protect my roses in the winter?
 
In cold climates there are many methods used for winter protection of roses. The main factor is insulating them from the cold and drying winds. We suggest you check with your local rose society, county agent, master gardeners, or nursery for advice on winter protection as practices vary from area to area. We suggest you use the zone rating on our on rose class descriptions and check with the USDA Zone may to be found under Rose Information. When you plant the correct rose for your zone it will survive with little or no protection.
  
back to top of page

26. My rose blooms only at the top of the canes and they are 10 feet tall. How can I make the rose bloom all over again?
 
Train the canes horizontally to get more blooms.
  
back to top of page

27. The leaves on my rose bushes are yellow and falling off. What does that mean?
 
It could be just the natural ageing of the leaves. It may mean a lack of water or check the leaves for blackspot. Even a rose that has been nearly defoliated by blackspot may be reinvigorated by summer pruning back to 18 inches or so. Remove and destroy all the affected leaves. Do not put them in the compost pile.
  
back to top of page

28. The catalog said my rose was supposed to be fragrant but it isn't. Why?
 
Sense of smell varies from person to person just as the sense of taste varies. Some varieties provide a fragrance that everyone may smell and others may be more subjective. For instance: John and I and three others of our staff were in the garden checking fragrance. The beautiful, deep pink, climber 'Viking Queen' produced a fragrance that John and two others found outstanding. One of the staff and I could smell nothing. I know a rose breeder who says he can never smell any fragrance on a yellow rose.
  
back to top of page

29. My rose doesn't rebloom like it is supposed to. What is wrong?
 
If your rose doesn't rebloom it could be a once blooming variety. Check the variety description on the web page or in the catalog. It could be an extra vigorous variety that is being over fertilized and is putting all its energy into growth and not bloom. It could be that you have the wrong rose.
  
back to top of page
  
30. Can I plant roses under pine and fir trees?
 
We have a number of rose planted under fir trees, although since they get reduced sunlight they may not bloom as much.
  
back to top of page
31. Can I spread bark dust around my roses?
 
Good fresh bark dust is fine. Beware of old compost barkdust that may contain fungi. As barkdust breaks down it draws nitrogen from the soil, so just a little extra fertilizer may be called for.
  
back to top of page
32. How do I take care of hanging basket roses?
 
Hanging basket roses need frequent watering during warm to hot weather as they may dry out rapidly. In areas where winter protection is needed you may bury the pot and all at frost time. Dig them up again in the Spring. You can also put them in a garage where the temperature doesn't drop below 28 degrees. Be sure to give them some water once a month or so.
  
back to top of page
  
33. The local nurseryman suggested using mushroom compost when I plant my roses. Is this okay?
 
If you put the mushroom compost in the bottom of the hole as a fertilizer when planting your roses it is fine. I hesitate to suggest using it as a top dressing as customers have reported problems with fungi being introduced into the rose garden.
  
back to top of page
  
34. Which kind of manure is the best?
 
First of all manure should be well aged for a year or more to be on the safe side. We do not recommend using manure around the roots. Use it in the bottom of the hole or as a top dressing around the bush. I think manure is the best fertilizer of all and will produce great roses. Apply 2 inches deep on the surface of the soil once or twice a year. My preference is horse manure. It is best obtained from stables that feed alfalfa hay and do not bed their stales with straw which contains seeds that will germinate in your garden. Steer manure is also a good choice.
  
back to top of page
  
35. Is it ever too hot to plant roses? Should I try to protect them from direct heat?
 
Roses are very heat tolerant. During very hot weather give them plenty of water. With new, young plants some type of shading using a shingle, cardboard, or shade cloth could be helpful. The major factor is don't let them dry out. Our greenhouse on a hot summer afternoon will sometimes reach 125 degrees with no damage to roses as long as they get plenty of water.
  
back to top of page
  
36. How can I protect my rose from deer?
 
I know of thirty different methods of protecting roses from deer. Unfortunately 28 of them don't work. A big dog and or an 8 - 10 foot fence will do the job.
  
back to top of page
  
37. Will any of my own-root roses "sucker"?
 
Own-root roses may send up new shoots from the base from time to time but they will be the same variety of rose not some unwanted root stock.
  
back to top of page
  
38. Can I use a root stimulant when I plant my roses?
 
You may use a root stimulant but it is not necessary.
  
back to top of page
39. How much growth will my climbers put on in the first year?
 
This will vary by the vigor of the variety. Climbers and ramblers will put out from 3 to 8 feet of growth the first year. Ramblers are the more vigorous of the two.
  
back to top of page
© 2002 — 2010, ClimbingRoses.com.